About

Meet the Scholars

Alulis Joseph_bw

Joseph Alulis is a professor of politics and government at North Park University, Chicago.  He earned his PhD in political science from the University of Chicago with a dissertation on Alexis de Tocqueville.  He has published a number of articles on Shakespeare as a political thinker, most recently, “The Very Heart of Loss” (2012) on Antony and Cleopatra, and is co-editor of a collection of critical essays entitled Shakespeare’s Political Pageant (1996). He is also an instructor in University of Chicago’s Graham School, Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies.

Bennett_alexandra

Alexandra Bennett is a Chicago-based actor, dramaturg, and an associate professor of English at Northern Illinois University, where she specializes in Shakespeare, early modern drama, modern British and American drama, and women’s and gender studies. She holds her PhD in English literature from Brandeis University, an MA in English literature from Western University (Canada) and a BA in English and history from Queen’s University (Canada).

 

Katie Blankenau

Katie Blankenau is a doctoral student in English literature at Northwestern University. She specializes in early modern drama and theater history, with a particular interest in hospitality and privacy on the early modern stage. She received her MA from Southern Methodist University, her BA in English and a BS in journalism from University of Kansas.

 

 

Bevington_david

David Bevington is the Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Humanities at University of Chicago, where he has taught English language, literature and comparative literature since 1967. He earned his BA, MA and PhD degrees from Harvard University. Dr. Bevington is one of the world’s eminent Shakespeare scholars. His numerous publications and editions include: Murder Most Foul: “Hamlet” Through the Ages, Shakespeare and Biography, This Wide and Universal Theater: Shakespeare in Performance Then and Now, Action Is Eloquence:  Shakespeare’s Language of Gesture, The Bantam Shakespeare, The Complete Works of Shakespeare, and the Norton Anthology of Renaissance Drama.

Gina Buccola

Regina Buccola is a professor and chair of the department of literature and languages at Roosevelt University in Chicago, where she also serves as core faculty in women’s and gender studies. Her most recent publications include (as editor) A Midsummer Night’s Dream: A Critical Guide and she co-edited, with Peter Kanelos, Chicago Shakespeare Theater: Suiting the Action to the Word. She serves as the scholar-in-residence at Chicago Shakespeare Theater.

 

Caldwell_casey

Casey Caldwell is a doctoral candidate in English at Northwestern University, where he specializes in the ontology and sexuality of money in early modern drama and intellectual texts. He holds his MFA in Shakespeare and performance, with a concentration on directing, from Mary Baldwin College, an MA in philosophy from University of Auckland, and a BA in philosophy from University of Texas at Austin.

 

 

Lydia Craig

Lydia Craig is a doctoral candidate at Loyola University Chicago, where she specializes in Victorian studies, with an additional focus on early modern drama. She holds an MA in English literature from Loyola University Chicago and a BA in English and history from the University of Georgia. www.lydiacraig.com

 

 

Gina Di Salvo

Gina Di Salvo is a lecturer in theatre at Northwestern University. She writes about Shakespeare, saints, and medieval and early modern theatre and religion. She holds a PhD from Northwestern University, an MA from Ohio State University, and a BA from The Catholic University of America. A professional dramaturg, she is also an artistic associate of Sideshow Theatre Company in Chicago.

 

 

Wendy Doniger

Wendy Doniger [O’Flaherty] is the Mircea Eliade Distinguished Service Professor of the History of Religions at the University of Chicago. She earned her BA at Radcliffe College, her PhD from Harvard University, and a DPhil from Oxford University. She is the author of over forty books, most recently The Woman Who Pretended to Be Who She Was (2005), The Hindus:  An Alternative History (2009), On Hinduism (2013) and Hinduism in the Norton Anthology of World Religions (2015).

 

Tim Duggan

Tim Duggan is an associate professor of Education at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, where he teaches English education and English courses, including Shakespeare, and coordinates a partnership between the University and Amundsen High School. He earned his EdD in curriculum and instruction from the University of South Dakota, his MA in English literature from the University of Nebraska and his BA in English literature from University of California at Santa Barbara. http://www.neiu.edu/academics/college-of-education/faculty/timothy-j-duggan

 

Rebecca Fall

Rebecca L. Fall is a doctoral candidate in English at Northwestern University. With the support of a 2015-16 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship, she is currently finishing her dissertation on nonsense writing, clownish language and silly jokes in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature. She holds an MA in English from Northwestern University and a BA in English from the University of Virginia.

 

UMC15-68 Drop In Head shots at LSC

Verna Foster is professor of English at Loyola University Chicago, where she specializes in modern drama, dramatic theory and Shakespeare. She holds her PhD, MPhil and BA in English from University of London. Her publications include a book on tragicomedy, as well as numerous articles.

 

 

Rick Gilbert

Richard Gilbert is a doctoral student in the English department at Loyola University Chicago. His research focuses on representations of violence in the theater, as well as adaptations and versionality. He holds an MA in humanities from University of Chicago, and a BA in theater from Brandeis University.

 

 

Gottsleben_cherrie

Cherrie Gottsleben is a doctoral student of Early Modern British literature at Northern Illinois University where she is also undertaking undergraduate studies in French. Her areas of interest include Shakespearean politics of identity and the religio-political pamphlet wars of seventeenth-century Britain. Her interests in theory focus on the thought of Michel de Certeau, Michel Foucault and Tzvetan Todorov. She holds an MA in English from Northeastern Illinois University and a BA in Communications (Writing) from Moody Bible Institute.

 

Hilary Gross

Hilary J. Gross is the inaugural British Literature Fellow at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she is pursuing her MA and PhD in the English Department with a focus on theater and Shakespeare, and a special interest in interdisciplinary opportunities. She graduated cum laude from Wellesley College with her BA in English literature and is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Eta Chapter of Massachusetts.

 

Kyle Haden

Kyle Haden is an assistant professor of theatre at Roosevelt University’s Chicago College of Performing Arts, as well as a professional actor and director, and the artistic director of the Ashland New Plays Festival in Ashland, Oregon. He holds his MFA from Columbia University in New York and his BA from Wake Forest University.

 

 

Sean Hannan

Sean Hannan is a doctoral candidate in the history of Christianity at University of Chicago Divinity School, where he specializes in intellectual history, the philosophy of time and the works of Augustine of Hippo. He is an instructor in University of Chicago’s Basic Program of Liberal Education for Adults as well as Saint Xavier University in Chicago. He holds his MA in the social sciences from University of Chicago and his BA in history from University of Alberta. chicago.academia.edu/SeanHannan

 

Hulse_clark

Clark Hulse is professor emeritus of English and art history at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Chair of the Board of Directors of the Chicago Humanities Festival. He is author of numerous books and articles about Shakespeare, Renaissance literature and visual culture. Hulse is a Guggenheim and NEH Fellow and curator of the award-winning exhibition Elizabeth I: Ruler and Legend at the Newberry Library. 

 

 

keener_andrew

Andrew S. Keener is a doctoral candidate in English at Northwestern University, where he researches drama, literary translation and the publication and use of bilingual dictionaries and grammar books in Renaissance England. He also has interests in rare book exhibit curation and computational approaches to language and literature. He holds an MA in English from North Carolina State University and a BA in English from Boston College. www.andrewkeener.net

 

Aaron_Krall

Aaron Krall is a lecturer in the department of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he teaches drama and first-year writing, and writes about theater and the city. He holds his PhD in English from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, an MS in theatre history from Illinois State University and his BA in English from University of St. Francis.

 

 

Stephanie Kucsera

Stephanie Kucsera is a doctoral candidate in English at Loyola University Chicago, where she specializes in early modern drama with a focus in inter-religious encounter and constructions of English nationhood. She holds an MA in English from Loyola University Chicago, an interdisciplinary MA from the University of Chicago, and her BA in theatre and English literature from the University of Indianapolis.

 

 

Ira Murfin

Ira S. Murfin is a doctoral candidate in the Interdisciplinary PhD in Theatre & Drama and the Graduate Assistant for Public Humanities with the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities at Northwestern University. His research focuses on language and performance across arts disciplines in the post-1960s American avant-garde. He holds an MFA in writing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BFA in playwriting from New York University.

 

Lori Humphrey Newcomb

Lori Humphrey Newcomb is an associate professor in the department of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research puts Shakespeare’s plays in dialogue with other printed books of the era. She earned her MA and PhD in English at Duke University and her BA in British Studies at Yale University. www.english.illinois.edu/people/lnewcomb

 

 

Martha Nussbaum

Martha C. Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at University of Chicago, appointed in the philosophy department and the law school. She writes on ethical and political philosophy, the history of Greek and Roman philosophy, feminism, gay rights and the nature of the emotions. She received her MA and PhD from Harvard, her BA from New York University and fifty-two honorary doctorates from universities in various countries.  www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/nussbaum

 

Lisa Portes2

Lisa Portes serves as head of the MFA Directing Program at The Theatre School at DePaul University.  She is a director, educator and producer dedicated to promoting new and contemporary work that reflects the aesthetic and cultural multiplicity of the United States. She holds an MFA in directing from University of California, San Diego and BA in Theatre from Oberlin College.

 

 

Raashi Rastogi

Raashi Rastogi is a doctoral candidate in English at Northwestern University. She studies and teaches Shakespeare and the literature of the English Renaissance with an emphasis on classical reception, gender and sexualities studies, and history of the book and media theory. She holds an MA in English literature from Northwestern University and a BA in English literature and international relations from the University of Virginia.

 

Cynthia Rutz_2

Cynthia Rutz is an instructor and past chair of University of Chicago’s Basic Program of Liberal Education, a great books discussion program for adults. She also teaches at and is Director of Faculty Development for Valparaiso University. She earned her PhD from the University of Chicago, with her dissertation on Shakespeare’s King Lear and its folktale analogues. She received her BA in mathematics and philosophy from St. John’s College, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

 

Lise Schlosser

Lise Schlosser is a doctoral candidate at Northern Illinois University completing her dissertation on narrative and crisis in the early seventeenth century in England. Her research interests include Shakespeare and early modern drama, performance studies, gender studies and metaphor. She holds her MA in English literature and her BA in anthropology from Northern Illinois University.

 

 

stevens_andrea_BW

Andrea Stevens is an associate professor of English, theatre and medieval studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she specializes in the drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. She holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Virginia, an MA in literature from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and a BA (Honors) in English from Huron University College in London, Ontario.

 

Tavares_elizabeth

Elizabeth Elaine Tavares is a doctoral candidate and instructor in the English department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she specializes in Shakespeare and Renaissance drama, with an emphasis on playing companies, theatre history and performance. She holds her MA in English literature from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a BA in English literature from DePaul University and a BA in history from DePaul University. www.elizabethetavares.com

 

Alfred_Thomas

Alfred Thomas is a professor of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he teaches courses on medieval and Renaissance literature. He has published eight books, including A Blessed Shore: England and Bohemia from Chaucer to Shakespeare (2007) and Shakespeare, Dissent, and the Cold War (2014).

 

 

Anna Ullman

Anna Ullman is a doctoral candidate in her fourth year at Loyola University Chicago specializing in Shakespeare and non-Shakespearean early modern drama, early modern historiography, and Marxist literary theory. She received an MA in English literature from Loyola University Chicago and her BA in English and sociology from Kalamazoo College.